(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Rapid Population Growth Consequences And Policy Implications"

Introduction
Volume II — Research Papers
The Study Committee acknowledges with gratitude the research and thought devoted to the preparation of these papers. We believe the authors represented have made a valuable contribution to the understanding of a very complex pattern of interacting forces—sometimes labeled the survival of the species. We hope the data presented will contribute to the examination of policy alternatives and will inspire further systematic study of the thorny problems of population growth.
We have profited greatly from discussions and arguments with the authors of these papers, but each paper stands on its own merit and is the work of the author. In some cases there are differences of opinion between individual committee members and authors, and there are inconsistencies between and among authors. We have tried to encourage a high level of scholarship and acceptance of a few common definitions, but we have not imposed either our standards or our definitions on these scholars.
Readers may well ask why this group of authors was selected rather than some other group. Many well-known American experts are conspicuous by their absence, and no scholars from abroad are included. The answer is simply that in order to provide modestly comprehensive coverage of the topics considered most important in the time allotted to the study, some arbitrary decisions had to be made. It was important to bring together the authors and committee members at the summer review and study sessions held in 1968 and 1969 at Woods Hole, Massachusetts. This meant limiting ourselves largely to those authors who were available for these meetings. We were also limited by the availability of authors in general. More simply put, this would have been a thicker volume if previous commitments, sabbatical leaves, the demands of existing research projects, and other academic impedimenta had not stood in the way.
We regret not having contributions from abroad. The scheduling and costs of bringing any significant number of people from around the world to our